Dibbling


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I "dibbled" for potatoes today--just digging lightly around the plants with my fingers to see if there was anything developing, and if there was anything, was it big enough to pull and have for supper. I came up with one Kinnebec (first year we've tried these, but they look good so far), and six Red LaSodas. None were bigger than a golf ball, but that is the joy of just out of the ground, tiny potatoes that taste so good!:happy:
 
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zigs

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Blimey, my International Kidneys are only 2 inches tall :eek:
 

Meadowlark

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I call it "robbing" and do it every year. Its great to have the new potatoes for eating...but the downside is reduced production vs what they would gain if left to maturity. I always go for a little robbery in spite of reduced production.
 

alp

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I thought someone said when the flowers have gone over, then the potatoes are ready. Potatoes are so cheap that I don't really bother growing them. Occasionally, I would chuck some into a container if they were organic or of a certain well known breed!
 

alp

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There is a 12 times spray programme for potatoes in the UK:


I spray mine with aspirin solution and compost tea.
Quite right. We should really grown our own. You can't trust anybody when it comes to money!
 

Meadowlark

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I thought someone said when the flowers have gone over, then the potatoes are ready. Potatoes are so cheap that I don't really bother growing them. Occasionally, I would chuck some into a container if they were organic or of a certain well known breed!
In my long experience with growing potatoes, to get maximum production, harvest after the plant itself falls over and begins to die. This normally happens here starting in mid-May. Its important here to get them out of the ground before Memorial day because they will rot quickly after that.

I average 10 pounds of harvest per 1 pound of seed cuttings....sometimes more, sometimes less. Price has absolutely nothing to do with why I grow them....nor any other garden veggie.

Simply put, I love the taste of new potatoes. Its a taste that you can not get from store bought versions. What we don't eat out of the ground, we can and/or store in a "dry", dark, breezy location. As long as they are properly stored, i.e. never touching each other, they will often keep until the next planting season...but we always eat them before that. I love the taste of new potatoes.

Spray? I never use it on potatoes. I'm very careful to dispose of the tops, rotate the planting row, and use cover crops in the planned location prior to planting seeds. No need to spray...just enjoy new potatoes.
 
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I have never grown taters. Any tips for northern gardens?
 
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In my long experience with growing potatoes, to get maximum production, harvest after the plant itself falls over and begins to die. This normally happens here starting in mid-May. Its important here to get them out of the ground before Memorial day because they will rot quickly after that.

I average 10 pounds of harvest per 1 pound of seed cuttings....sometimes more, sometimes less. Price has absolutely nothing to do with why I grow them....nor any other garden veggie.

Simply put, I love the taste of new potatoes. Its a taste that you can not get from store bought versions. What we don't eat out of the ground, we can and/or store in a "dry", dark, breezy location. As long as they are properly stored, i.e. never touching each other, they will often keep until the next planting season...but we always eat them before that. I love the taste of new potatoes.

Spray? I never use it on potatoes. I'm very careful to dispose of the tops, rotate the planting row, and use cover crops in the planned location prior to planting seeds. No need to spray...just enjoy new potatoes.
So you store all of them so no two potatoes are touching? That's gotta take some space? I'm trying to figure it the best way to store them here in the hot humid South.
 
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alp

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So you store all of them so no two potatoes are touching? That's gotta take some space? I'm trying to figure it the best way to store them here in the hot humid South.
Yes, storing puds can be very dodgy. One family was nearly all killed bar one kid because they didn't store their potatoes properly.

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Is this a winter crop that is planted in autum and harvested in late spring?
 

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We store potatoes in crisper drawers of the fridge, canning jars, and shed storage.

When stored in open space, it is important that they don't touch each other, have free air circulation, and never washed prior to storage. Here in East Texas, the summers are very long, very hot and very humid, all of which makes it a challenge for successful storage but we are able to have potatoes year around from the spring crop....as well as have a few for seed for the next year's crop.

My system doesn't have the elegance of a Colin construction...but it is very effective, nonetheless. Also it serves as onion storage.
potatoe storage.JPG
 

zigs

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Is this a winter crop that is planted in autum and harvested in late spring?
No, potatoes can't go out until frost has passed, or you protect the tops with fleece or cloches.

New potatoes are lovely if you get the cooking water boiling before you dig them and lob them straight in, but to store them it's best to wait 2 weeks after the tops (haulms) have dropped so that the skins harden before digging them.
 

Meadowlark

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No, potatoes can't go out until frost has passed, ...
Actually, here, they need to be planted well before last frost date for spring crop...about three weeks before. It takes about that long for them to show above ground and there is no danger of killing frost or freeze until then. So, we plant on Valentines day and by the time the plants show above ground, most of the risk of frost is passed here. Even light freezes aren't fatal...just reduce production somewhat.

The potatoes need every bit of cool weather they can have here while growing and three weeks before last freeze helps with that.
 
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zigs

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Actually, here, they need to be planted well before last frost date for spring crop...about three weeks before. It takes about that long for them to show above ground and there is no danger of killing frost or freeze until then. So, we plant on Valentines day and by the time the plants show above ground, most of the risk of frost is passed here. Even light freezes aren't fatal...just reduce production somewhat.

The potatoes need every bit of cool weather they can have here while growing and three weeks before last freeze helps with that.
Started some off in the greenhouse already, should get the first crop by mid June :)

DSCF1428.JPG
 

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