Decrative pear issues help needed


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Morning all,
New to gardening and the tree front of my house been told is decrative pear mine is only one in street with issues.

Doesn't look like fire blight or rust?

See same tree in back ground thriving.

Any chance I can save it or identify what issue is.
Thanks in advance for help
 

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Hello, welcome to the Forum.

This Decorative or Ornamental Pear (Pyrus calleryana cv.) does look in bad shape. The branching angles suggest this may be the cultivar 'Capital'. Would you or a neighbor know by any chance? Also, how long has this tree been in the ground since it was planted?

In any case, the first factor I would investigate is drainage and irrigation. A pear tree that was planted in poorly draining location would likely look like this. The specific details of the planting hole can effect this. Is the base of the tree on a mound or in a well? Another photo of the base would be helpful. Dig an exploratory hole near the tree and see what the subsurface drainage looks like. A hole at the edge of the original planting hole is a good location. If the tree is receiving supplemental irrigation, consider stopping or reducing it. If the tree can be reasonably lifted, I would consider replanting it. The best arrangement would be to plant the tree on a mound, sloping to a shallow moat just beyond the drip line. If the current location will not accommodate that, you could even move it to another spot.
Hello, welcome to the Forum.

This Decorative or Ornamental Pear (Pyrus calleryana cv.) does look in bad shape. The branching angles suggest this may be the cultivar 'Capital'. Would you or a neighbor know by any chance? Also, how long has this tree been in the ground since it was planted?

In any case, the first factor I would investigate is drainage and irrigation. A pear tree that was planted in poorly draining location would likely look like this. The specific details of the planting hole can effect this. Is the base of the tree on a mound or in a well? Another photo of the base would be helpful. Dig an exploratory hole near the tree and see what the subsurface drainage looks like. A hole at the edge of the original planting hole is a good location. If the tree is receiving supplemental irrigation, consider stopping or reducing it. If the tree can be reasonably lifted, I would consider replanting it. The best arrangement would be to plant the tree on a mound, sloping to a shallow moat just beyond the drip line. If the current location will not accommodate that, you could even move it to another spot.
 
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Hello Marck firstly thank you so much for great detailed reply.

This is planter at bottom of a angled lawn of I suspect water drains down to this bed.

The tree was planted in a dug hole and has a water feeding pipe installed. With wood chop on top.

this is the second tree placed here as the first died before we moved in (new build) if this is a drainage issue as you suspect due to the lawn and then hard concrete tarmac either side.
20210903_162037.jpg
 

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Thank you for the additional photos. Actually, they don't show any obvious problem, but drainage problems often don't show on the surface. I was just concerned that the tree's base might be sitting in a depression. That often happens when a tree is planted at grade level and then sinks.

Some things to try at the surface: Investigate the tree's base to see if it is at all buried. Clear mulch and turf away from the trunk. Trying stopping or reducing additional irrigation. Try to divert lawn runoff.

Of course, if the real problem is below the surface, none of those things may make a difference. Pyrus calleryana is widely planted because it is tolerant of soil and drainage problems, but there are limits. If this tree does succumb, investigate the drainage of the planting hole before planting again. Perhaps a willow, alder, or birch would be a good choice.

I'm not sure, but the only disease that this reminds of is a root rot, and that is basically just the end result of poor drainage anyway.
 

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