Damaged Flower Bulbs


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I'm a very upset plant mom right now :(
Back in February my husband got me this beautiful purple clustered flower. It had three thick stems with bright cluster of flowers. Even after the flowers had passed I continued to take care of it because it was a perennial. I was hoping it would bloom again! The bulbs and roots are still very much alive but the homeowner of where we stay at chopped the top of the bulbs off! Does anybody know if they'll be okay? Should I try to save them or are they done for?
 

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Those bulbs look like Hyacinths (Hyacinthus orientalis). If so, they should be dormant now. Any foliage cut off in Summer would have been dead or dying. The tops of the bulbs do look somewhat damaged, but perhaps not fatally so. I would plant them in a sunny spot and see if they re-emerge next Spring. If you see any open wounds on the bulbs you could dust them with sulfur powder before planting to discourage rot, though that is not necessary to do with healthy bulbs. Fall is a good time to plant Hyacinths and other Spring bulbs. Perhaps buy some more bulbs to insure a good display.
 
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This guy bulbs.

I too find bulbs remarkably resilient. I have committed many bulb crimes. Usually just forgetting where they were whilst planting something else. I am always shocked when they come back. Nature finding a way I suppose, but a bulb is a very energetic store of plant energy that can push through situations that your insurance company would freak out about.
 
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Awesome! It makes me happy to know that there is hope lol I'll be repotting them and I'll continue to keep an eye on them. Thank you both for the replies!
 
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On occasion as I am planting a new plant, or shrub in the digging process slice through a bulb or two. I just dig them up put them aside. after I am done with planting what ever it is, I put them back, next year they are up just fine. just to add, I do my best to recall where all 200 Thousand bulbs are, but miss a few now and then.
 
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Plant your hyacinth bulbs between early to mid fall. As Marck suggested, plant additional hyacinth bulbs.
 
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Plant your hyacinth bulbs between early to mid fall. As Marck suggested, plant additional hyacinth bulbs.
I've repotted it! I cant actually put them in the ground because I dont have a property of my own yet so all my plants are potted! I did recently get a really large pot so I might pot some more or something else. Idk yet! Thank you!
 
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Hyacinth bought in pots usually draw a lot of energy from the bulb to flower that well. I plant them out in the garden the next year and usually find it takes them two or three years to recover, don't expect too much from them in the first year, even in a larger pot.
 
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Hyacinth bought in pots usually draw a lot of energy from the bulb to flower that well. I plant them out in the garden the next year and usually find it takes them two or three years to recover, don't expect too much from them in the first year, even in a larger pot.
Thank you! I will be cautiously optimistic :)
 
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Hi, you should be able to store the bulbs until you have more peace of mind. Storing would also keep them from infection or other issues from their wounded tops. Most sources advise a paper bag, somewhere cool and dry. I did this one time before discovering I did not have to do it, and in the absence of a paper bag, I used a sturdy cardboard box. You would still be able to replant them while it is fall, since hopefully they are only slightly and temporarily compromised. I am fairly certain I have bought and received bulbs that looked much worse, so I do think you will be pleased with their resilience.
 
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Hi, you should be able to store the bulbs until you have more peace of mind. Storing would also keep them from infection or other issues from their wounded tops. Most sources advise a paper bag, somewhere cool and dry. I did this one time before discovering I did not have to do it, and in the absence of a paper bag, I used a sturdy cardboard box. You would still be able to replant them while it is fall, since hopefully they are only slightly and temporarily compromised. I am fairly certain I have bought and received bulbs that looked much worse, so I do think you will be pleased with their resilience.
I didn't know i could store bulbs with roots on them. Thank you for the information!
 

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