Compost


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What should I put in my compost I have no idea what to use and I have thrown in some celery sticks, banana peels, grass clippings, etc I would love to know what you would suggest.
 
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Compost is basically rotted "stuff". No dairy, no meat because these attract rodents and pests. Any yard waste like grass clippings or twigs, kitchen peelings, egg shells, leaves--all good. Just pile it up, give it a toss occasionally, and after a couple of months you'll see dark soil at the bottom of the pile. Compost! Use it for side dressing plants, adding to soil for containers, and for just tossing about the garden.
I've posted a photo of our compost bins. Remember we are on a farm, have lots of "waste", and can distribute the compost over four gardens. You will want to start smaller.
 

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Compost is basically rotted "stuff". No dairy, no meat because these attract rodents and pests. Any yard waste like grass clippings or twigs, kitchen peelings, egg shells, leaves--all good. Just pile it up, give it a toss occasionally, and after a couple of months you'll see dark soil at the bottom of the pile. Compost! Use it for side dressing plants, adding to soil for containers, and for just tossing about the garden.
I've posted a photo of our compost bins. Remember we are on a farm, have lots of "waste", and can distribute the compost over four gardens. You will want to start smaller.
Thanks we are using a plastic storage bin because we are going to have a very small garden. Thanks you are so very helpful
 

alp

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Here is a suggestion by the world famous Royal Horticultural Society in the UK

Getting the right balance of composting materials
  • Aim for between 25 and 50 percent soft green materials (e.g. grass clippings, annual weeds, vegetable kitchen waste, or manure) to feed the micro-organisms
  • The remainder should be woody brown material (e.g. prunings, wood chippings, paper, cardboard, straw or dead leaves)
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=444

It's not that long so you can have a look.
 
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Here is a suggestion by the world famous Royal Horticultural Society in the UK

Getting the right balance of composting materials
  • Aim for between 25 and 50 percent soft green materials (e.g. grass clippings, annual weeds, vegetable kitchen waste, or manure) to feed the micro-organisms
  • The remainder should be woody brown material (e.g. prunings, wood chippings, paper, cardboard, straw or dead leaves)
https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=444

It's not that long so you can have a look.
thanks
 
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Dixon, I forgot to mention that you need drainage. We don't worry because our compost piles are out in the open and on soil.
If you are using a plastic bin, put a few holes (at least 1/2" holes) in the bottom for excess moisture to drain away. Compost generates a bit of moisture, and if it gets too wet it goes nasty. You'll also need to stir the material in your bin to keep it from matting up. I use a pitchfork, but for your bin, a small digging fork or small rake ought to do the job.
 
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Dixon, I forgot to mention that you need drainage. We don't worry because our compost piles are out in the open and on soil.
If you are using a plastic bin, put a few holes (at least 1/2" holes) in the bottom for excess moisture to drain away. Compost generates a bit of moisture, and if it gets too wet it goes nasty. You'll also need to stir the material in your bin to keep it from matting up. I use a pitchfork, but for your bin, a small digging fork or small rake ought to do the job.
thanks marling
 
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Leaves, worms, dry fertilizer amendments like rock powders, yard waste, humic acid, and manure. Other than that add your food scraps. My pile is now nearing 100% worm castings as the worms have moved in and taken over. When I turn the top 4” of my pile I grab dozens of worms over with a handful.
 
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alp

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Your compost sounds yummy!
 

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