Chuck's Okra


Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
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Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Earlier this spring I was having trouble getting my jambalaya okra seeds to germinate because of cool weather and I asked Chuck if he happened to have any okra extra seed he could send me. Turns out he had some of his own "heritage" okra seed which he was kind to send to me...and perhaps he can post the story of it here.

Chuck's okra is distinct from others I have seen...seems to be shorter fuller more "squatty" fruit. Interesting to see differences. Haven't tasted any yet so no comment in that regard.

Okra is just now really producing ....the hotter the better. Its a summer staple around here....and my thanks to Chuck for some of his seeds. I'll save seeds from them for future years.

Chuck's okra right bottom, jambalaya left bottom.


Chucks okra.JPG
 
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Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
10,147
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Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Earlier this spring I was having trouble getting my jambalaya okra seeds to germinate because of cool weather and I asked Chuck if he happened to have any okra extra seed he could send me. Turns out he had some of his own "heritage" okra seed which he was kind to send to me...and perhaps he can post the story of it here.

Chuck's okra is distinct from others I have seen...seems to be shorter fuller more "squatty" fruit. Interesting to see differences. Haven't tasted any yet so no comment in that regard.

Okra is just now really producing ....the hotter the better. Its a summer staple around here....and my thanks to Chuck for some of his seeds. I'll save seeds from them for future years.

Chuck's okra right bottom, jambalaya left bottom.


View attachment 90489
I was given some seeds by an old man who is a direct descendant of the origional German/Polish settlers about 25 years ago They first arrived in Texas about 1820 and they brought these seeds with them. Since then this same strain of seeds has been planted every year. There are seeds for sale on line which are called Becks Big Buck and Snapping Okra. They possibly could be the same okra as they look identical. Most years these okra are picked at the size as shown in the picture but some years for some reason the okra grow quite a bit larger before they should be picked. They should be picked while they still easily "snap" off of the plant. When you have to pull them off they might be a little tough and stringy. On a good year the plants will grow to 8+ feet with numerous side limbs also producing pods. It looks amazingly like a Christmas Tree. The base of the stalk will be 2-3 inches in diameter. The soil in this part of Texas where this strain of seeds came from is very alkaline. I didn't know if they would even produce in the acidic soils of East Texas but it appears they do. This year I cheated and planted the seeds in seedling containers and got a head start and planted right after the hail storm that wiped out most of my garden. My plants have started producing and I have already frozen 4 quart freezer bags of cut okra and the plants are only about 2 - 2 1/2 feet tall and I have 36 plants. In another month I will be giving okra away
 

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