Canning Tomatoes - water bath or pressure canner


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As I read my Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving it has recipes dedicated to crushed tomatoes processed in simple water bath and processed in a pressure canner. Is there a benefit to using the pressure canner over the water bath processing? Water bath calls for 45 mins boiling plus 5 rest in water before removal. The pressure calls for 10 boiling, 15 at pressure, then 10 after pressure was released. To me that sounds like the pressure canner will take longer overall.
 
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Tomatoes are high in acid so do not require pressure canning. Not sure if it makes a difference in shelf life but I just use water bath canner.
 
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I pressure can all plant food. Ball rules need a revision.
 

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Pressure can tomatoes here. Usually do about 30 quarts to last until the next growing season. Never had a problem.
 
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I do 2-3 dozen jars of tomatoes, sauce and salsa every year for last 30 years. No problems. regular water bath canner.
 
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I see no reason to use a water bath. Pressure canning is slightly more simple. A new Presto canner lasts indefinitely.
 
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I had a pressure canner, used it several times but my cooktop is not suited for it. I use an electric waterbath canner now.
 
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Thanks all.

I processed 10 qts of crushed tomatoes in water bath so far this year. I don't think I will have enough more to warrant canning more.

Pressure canning is slightly more simple. A new Presto canner lasts indefinitely.
It is? Reading about it seems more things to do than simply bring to a boil and set a timer. But I have not done it.

I have the Presto pressure canner but have only used it as a water bath canner or a homebrew beer kettle. This is my first year in a new house with a garden large enough to have more produce than we can eat fresh.
 
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Oh yeah - I use the 2012 edition of Ball Complete guide to Home Preserving. The only other source I trust is the USDA National Center for Home Food Preservation guide. Going by memory that PDF guide was hosted through the University of Georgia website.

Are there more up to date better sources?
 
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The purpose of pressure canning is to insure all the ingredients in the jars reaches 240F for some arbitrary time. I have chosen 15 minuts for the time.

Solid chunks of material can be insulated from the heat. I overcome this by making all ingredients a homogeneous slurry.

The researchers achieve even heat by playing with the pressure and time, and taking measurements and writing papers. Hence those silly charts.

I have canned over 3000 liter jars of most plants and never had one jar spoil. My method is foolproof and it works.
 
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Never had a jar of tomato products bad either and neither did my mother, grandmother or 2 neighbors so good enough for me.
 
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That's my final comment on the subject, what works for one person, may not be accepted by another. My method has been used for decades so it's fine by me. If others feel it's necessary to pressure can, then go for it.
 
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I've heard that the concern here is that modern varieties of tomatoes don't have near as much acid as some of the heirloom varieties, and that's why they are recommending pressure canning now. You have a slight risk of botulism with the less acidic varieties, so they changed up the guidelines in most of the canning recipes a while back.
 
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I have been canning tomatoes in pint & quart jars for 43 years most red tomatoes have plenty of acid to do water bath canning. Yellow color Low acid tomatoes are best to pressure cook them. Before you put tomatoes in jars decide what you want to cook them in? We use tomatoes, soups, stews, enchilada sauce, we puree whole tomatoes in the food processor with skins & seeds then bring 3 gallons to a boil in a large pot. No need to boil clean jars & lids you can not kill germs & bacteria twice. Hot pack jars with hot cooked tomatoes fill jars up to ½" from the top. BOOK says to add salt but people with high blood pressure leave it out. Salt helps to hold the red color of the tomatoes but color will not be a problem until jars have been in the kitchen pantry 4 years. I leave the salt out. Clean top of jars then put on a new seal then tighten the ring fairly tight. Fill canner with Hot jars then fill canner with water that is about as hot as the jars. Water should be ½" above jars. Cold water on hot jars will crack the glass. Heat canner up slow to a boil once water starts to boil start timing. Book will tell you the cook time. Once tomatoes boil THEN all germs & bacteria will be DEAD. There is no reason to be paranoid about killing germs & bacteria twice by boiling empty jars that will be boiled with the boiling tomatoes. Skins add lots of flavor to tomatoes. If you don't like seeds slice tomatoes then drops then in a large pan of water seeds wash away scoop out the cut tomato pieces with a French fry scoop water & seeds go out through the large holes in the wire scoop. If you remove seeds the jell will wash away too this makes your cooked tomatoes have a better tomato flavor & sell watery. When cook time ends turn off the stove but do not remove jars from the boiling water. Leave jars in hot water to slowly cool naturally for about 4 hours. Remove jars from room temperature water then you might need to wash outside of jars clean. When lids are dry put the DATE on all the lids. Also don't believe the old wives tale that you need to add vinegar to tomatoes to help prevent them from spoiling all that does is make good flavor tomatoes taste like vinegar. I have canned lots of different varieties of tomatoes in 43 years if your tomatoes have good acid already you don't need to add more acid like vinegar. Taste your tomatoes see how they taste. If you want to know for sure how much acid your tomatoes have buy a $1 pack of HP paper then test your tomatoes. If you think tomatoes have low acid like yellow tomatoes then pressure can your tomatoes don't destroy the good tomato flavor by adding acid.
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Thanks guys. And I know there is a lot or opinions out there.

I am starting to like @Durgan's idea of pressure canning everything. I have the presto pressure canner but have only used it for beer brewing and water bath canning so far.
 

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