Canning potatos


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this is my second-year canning potatoes. 18 pints x 11 times this year. the last 2 batches the water has turned cloudy and thick in a few of the pints. all have sealed. all taste fine. anyone have an ideas as to why this would happen?
 
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Meadowlark

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My old canning book says, "An over-processed potato no matter the variety will make the liquid they are canned in look cloudy."

As long as you have a good seal on the can it should be fine.
 
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My old canning book says, "An over-processed potato no matter the variety will make the liquid they are canned in look cloudy."

As long as you have a good seal on the can it should be fine.
They all seal. just strange how some get cloudy and some do not. thanks
 
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I think it will be starch, I guess some are 'riper' than others and lose starch to the water more easily. What puzzles me is that it seems like a lot of work and expense, 6b does not strike me as being particularly warm. Can't you simply store in a cool place, or even make clamps to store? I am fairly ignorant on the subject of zones mind, I think it is only about minimum winter temperatures, so it may not take other things into account.
 
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The type of potato can be the issue. I refer to them as soft or hard . Hard potatoes keep their firmness better when cooking and release fewer starches. Red is an example.

Soft potatoes do break down and release starches easily. Baking varieties for example.

Overcooked will release starches in any variety.
 
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I think it will be starch, I guess some are 'riper' than others and lose starch to the water more easily. What puzzles me is that it seems like a lot of work and expense, 6b does not strike me as being particularly warm. Can't you simply store in a cool place, or even make clamps to store? I am fairly ignorant on the subject of zones mind, I think it is only about minimum winter temperatures, so it may not take other things into account.
yeah I do keep some in the basement. have a rack and a fan set up for air flow. about 80% make it and 20 % rot. in canning 100% make it.

I boill and freeze some also. that is 100% if we dont lose power. which seldom happens
 
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The type of potato can be the issue. I refer to them as soft or hard . Hard potatoes keep their firmness better when cooking and release fewer starches. Red is an example.

Soft potatoes do break down and release starches easily. Baking varieties for example.

Overcooked will release starches in any variety.
these are red Pontiac. I tend to can access. I grow Yukon Golds also and tend to store them.
 
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Question, did you use a fresh batch of water each time or did you use the same water to boil potatoes as you went?

It might just be the starch content building up in the water as more potatoes released their starch.
 
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I would imagine that the method of cooking the potatoes is not delivering exactly the same heat to all areas of the pan.
Do you par boil them prior to canning?
 
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