Best Zucchini / Courgette variety


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Which varieties of Zucchini / Courgette have you grown, that you were really pleased with and would happily recommend to others ?

When I first started growing Zucchini, I didn't really worry about what variety they were, so long as the seed packet or plant pot said Zucchini or Courgette on it, sometimes with some very disappointing results and quickly found out, that you need to get the right variety, not only for your garden but also for taste.

Nowadays there are so many different varieties to choose from, that suit every climate, and range from, the flavorsome, to the self pollinators and good croppers, on to those that are said to be mildew resistant, but still, they don't always live up to our expectations. This is where I thought, that with all the different climates, we Zucchini growers live in, sharing our experiences and recommendations with each other may be useful to others, as well as enjoyable.

I'm always on the lookout for other varieties of course, but through trial and error plus one recommendation, I have four varieties that I have grown for the past 4 years and would happily recommend them to anyone, who lives in a warm climate,

Eight Ball - Round Zucchini, I like this one because they are great for putting on the barbecue and stuffing, they are prolific croppers, with a long season and stay reasonably compact.

Bambino F1 - This one was recommended to me and is great for cooking, as the skins are thin, is very flavorsome and the flesh remains firm, meaning it doesn't disintegrate like some do, even with minimal cooking, is a high yield, well behaved plant that is more mildew resistant than others.

Atena Polka F1 - Has all the same attributes of Bambino, but is yellow skinned with a slightly nutty flavor.

New Orleans - A pale skinned almost white Zucchini with faint green stripes, nothing particularly outstanding about the plant, but it is well worth growing for the delicious sweet tasting flesh.

What are you going to recommend?
 
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I will have to check, but I was given some seedlings of a pale white/yellow (no stripes) that my friend said had been brought from Italy. The taste was so different from any I had ever tried. Sort of buttery but bold. Very hard to describe but I am trying my second crop from seeds I gathered. I wonder if they are related to the New Orleans you mentioned.
 
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I had honestly never even thought about trying different varieties of zucchini before, but now I'm thinking maybe I'll have to try something new next year....
 
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I find that I like best some of the old varieties of many veg, and I like the "Green Bush" type.
The seeds are cheap and reliable, I get a plentiful supply of courgettes, and the last few I can leave on to mature into marrows.
 
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I will have to check, but I was given some seedlings of a pale white/yellow (no stripes) that my friend said had been brought from Italy. The taste was so different from any I had ever tried. Sort of buttery but bold. Very hard to describe but I am trying my second crop from seeds I gathered. I wonder if they are related to the New Orleans you mentioned.


Although, I do get all my fruit and vegetable seeds from Italy, I couldn't say if yours are related to the New Orleans variety.
I think like you, many more people are preferring the white and pale green varieties, which is why, so many more varieties are now becoming available, I've tasted many varieties of the white/pale green and most have, in my opinion, all had a delicious flavor, which I prefer over the green ones, apart from those that I put on the barbeque. I only grow the New Orleans variety because it has been a successful and reliable plant for me, but I wouldn't hesitate to try another white variety if New Orleans was unavailable. Hope you get your second crop growing well.



I find that I like best some of the old varieties of many veg, and I like the "Green Bush" type.
The seeds are cheap and reliable, I get a plentiful supply of courgettes, and the last few I can leave on to mature into marrows.



Agree with you, many of the old vegetables varieties are better, especially taste-wise

Am very keen to know a bit more about the " Green Bush " type. Is it actually a bush and does it take up less space
than the traditional variety?
 
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Yes they are compact,
I grow some in 14" (35cm) pots connected to my watering system.
I gave the lady next door a 5 1/2 lb (2,5kg) last week as I had some to spare.
 
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Thank you for the tip. I love mine and they predominate my garden, but I wouldn't mind to save a little space.
 
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Which varieties of Zucchini / Courgette have you grown, that you were really pleased with and would happily recommend to others ?

When I first started growing Zucchini, I didn't really worry about what variety they were, so long as the seed packet or plant pot said Zucchini or Courgette on it, sometimes with some very disappointing results and quickly found out, that you need to get the right variety, not only for your garden but also for taste.

Nowadays there are so many different varieties to choose from, that suit every climate, and range from, the flavorsome, to the self pollinators and good croppers, on to those that are said to be mildew resistant, but still, they don't always live up to our expectations. This is where I thought, that with all the different climates, we Zucchini growers live in, sharing our experiences and recommendations with each other may be useful to others, as well as enjoyable.

I'm always on the lookout for other varieties of course, but through trial and error plus one recommendation, I have four varieties that I have grown for the past 4 years and would happily recommend them to anyone, who lives in a warm climate,

Eight Ball - Round Zucchini, I like this one because they are great for putting on the barbecue and stuffing, they are prolific croppers, with a long season and stay reasonably compact.

Bambino F1 - This one was recommended to me and is great for cooking, as the skins are thin, is very flavorsome and the flesh remains firm, meaning it doesn't disintegrate like some do, even with minimal cooking, is a high yield, well behaved plant that is more mildew resistant than others.

Atena Polka F1 - Has all the same attributes of Bambino, but is yellow skinned with a slightly nutty flavor.

New Orleans - A pale skinned almost white Zucchini with faint green stripes, nothing particularly outstanding about the plant, but it is well worth growing for the delicious sweet tasting flesh.

What are you going to recommend?

There is one of the white-yellow ones in this picture. Do you think this is related to the New Orleans you mentioned?
061313153707.jpeg
 
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Spooky :D how did you manage to read my question, before I'd even managed to post it.:) Many thanks for the information, always wanted to grow some zucchini in a pot and now I can, once again many thanks.




There is one of the white-yellow ones in this picture. Do you think this is related to the New Orleans you mentioned?View attachment 979


Yours is similar, but mine have a slightly more defined green stripe, have just looked to see, if I had one left so that I could take a photo for you, but as I thought, unfortunately in all respects, used the last one in supper last night.
As you've already got some seeds of one that you like very much, why not plant those, but at the same time, try growing another variety of white to see if the taste matches up to your original one. As I mentioned earlier, I've found that most varieties of white taste equally delicious, don't think you can go too far wrong, whichever one you choose. :)
 

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