Best flowers/set up for garden photography ?


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I am a portrait photographer and love doing outdoor shoots. Being able to create a natural backdrop in my backyard would be incredible. It would make my work not only easier, but also faster bring right there. Could any of you give me suggestions for that please ? I'm talking something simple but pretty and not too pricey.
 
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JBtheExplorer

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I am a portrait photographer and love doing outdoor shoots. Being able to create a natural backdrop in my backyard would be incredible.

The best thing I could suggest is adding plants that are native to Mexico, especially native to your exact area. That's the best way to get a real natural backdrop, and as a bonus, it would attract insect and animal life to your garden, which would give you even more subjects to photograph. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about plants native to Mexico, so I can't give you any specific suggestions. I would recommend searching the web with phrases like "Plants Native to Mexico" or "Native Mexican Plants".
 
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The best thing I could suggest is adding plants that are native to Mexico, especially native to your exact area. That's the best way to get a real natural backdrop, and as a bonus, it would attract insect and animal life to your garden, which would give you even more subjects to photograph. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about plants native to Mexico, so I can't give you any specific suggestions. I would recommend searching the web with phrases like "Plants Native to Mexico" or "Native Mexican Plants".
Thank you for the suggestions! I will look up what plants native to my area I can use. Mexican plants are super colorful so they will make great backdrops no matter what. I will look up soemthing that doesn't require much care though since I am rarely at home at all.
 
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There are so many plants native to Mexico it will make your head spin. Many of the plants grown in the more northern climates (US, Canada, Europe) as annuals are native to Mexico. I am in the tropical zone and i don't know where you are or what your elevation is. I would recommend bougainvillea as a spectacularly photogenic plant that is the most beautiful when neglected. Also, Ixora coccinea (not the dwarf variety) is an easy to grow plant with lovely blooms and vegetation. Plumbago is beautiful and easy to grow (depending on your climate) and there are dozens of exotic showy vines. And lets not forget Hibiscus. If i were you, i would take a walk around the local parks, take a photo of what you like and then take the photos to a good vivero near and ask if they have the plant, what is it, if it is easy to grow, etc. Many of the plants i mention above become quite large, for some smaller plants you might like some of the sages,for example, salvia coccinea is a stunner. Have fun, you will be amazed at the abundance. oh yes, and let's not forget Cosmos (grows wild, i've never seen it sold in garden centers but you can purchase seeds from the US and UK).
 
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I saw this earlier, but did not reply. What came to me as I saw it up again was the color of this "flower/plant" back ground you "might" work hard to develop. I am a real red head, if I went somewhere and was sat in front of a pink flower, or another color that would go against my coloring, I would not sit there. Just saying, that one has to think of the neutral colors that would go with all folks you might work with. Just saying.
 
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There are so many plants native to Mexico it will make your head spin. Many of the plants grown in the more northern climates (US, Canada, Europe) as annuals are native to Mexico. I am in the tropical zone and i don't know where you are or what your elevation is. I would recommend bougainvillea as a spectacularly photogenic plant that is the most beautiful when neglected. Also, Ixora coccinea (not the dwarf variety) is an easy to grow plant with lovely blooms and vegetation. Plumbago is beautiful and easy to grow (depending on your climate) and there are dozens of exotic showy vines. And lets not forget Hibiscus. If i were you, i would take a walk around the local parks, take a photo of what you like and then take the photos to a good vivero near and ask if they have the plant, what is it, if it is easy to grow, etc. Many of the plants i mention above become quite large, for some smaller plants you might like some of the sages,for example, salvia coccinea is a stunner. Have fun, you will be amazed at the abundance. oh yes, and let's not forget Cosmos (grows wild, i've never seen it sold in garden centers but you can purchase seeds from the US and UK).
Sounds like a spectacular garden backdrop Beverly. I recently become aware of plumbago and have seen a beautiful bright blue one which we can't seem to find in the nurseries. There are 3 of us on a mission(y).
 
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@DeborahJane...good luck with your Plumbago mission. I showed mine on the "What's looking good for May 2016" thread. It is still a tiny tot but is growing well. The leaf cutter ants are showing themselves via perfectly rounded holes at the edges of some of the leaves and i am showing myself with a DE encirclement (which is going to be a gooey mess if it rains, but DE is a good fertilizer as well so i will just dig the gooey mess in). They are lurking and i am paying attention and treating small areas where they are starting to settle in. I have much fewer of those ants this year than last, but the season is young. @zigs said up to now he thought plumbago was a kind of pudding that gives you back ache.:LOL::ROFLMAO: So, funny, Where did you see the plant? Do you think the owner would give you 3 cuttings? It grows very nicely in the warm humidity, although i think it must be fall or winter now where you are. On the same "What's looking good..." thread, Dinu (a new member from zone 10 India) showed photos of a red plumbago which i had never seen before and did not know of its existence, there is also white, but i really do love the blue one and hope your team manages to find one or three.:)
 
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There are a few favourites of mine. One of them is the Tithonia - presently not in the garden. This is an old photo. The glowing red in a particular amount of light is something that we don't get from other flowers, may be to a little extent some shades of Zinnias.
 

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