Best Blueberries and Raspberries for Coastal North Carolina?


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Wondering if anyone can recommend good cultivars of these two (and anything else you know would grow well here) for the Coast North Carolina climate? it's hot, humid and buggy :) Would love to grow these berries, but not sure where to start :)
thanks !
 
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Meadowlark

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I've successfully grown the rabbiteye varieties of Tifblue and Titan here about 100 miles inland coastal Texas...hot, humid, and buggy. You need acidic soils and multiple plants help with pollination. The first year be very careful to not let them dry out too much.

For raspberries, I've grown the Latham Red from Stark Bros. It did well here...too well...as it became invasive in my garden and I had to get rid of it.
 
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what is the soil pH where you intend to plant them? Is it in a full sun area?
I don't know the pH, but already reached out to the local arboretum and hoping they can test the soil for me. If it's too alkaline, would it be a successful attempt to amend the soil? or am i setting myself up for failure?

I have two spots- one would be very sunny, another one will be in front of kitchen windows and would have moderate shade. What do they prefer?
 
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I've successfully grown the rabbiteye varieties of Tifblue and Titan here about 100 miles inland coastal Texas...hot, humid, and buggy. You need acidic soils and multiple plants help with pollination. The first year be very careful to not let them dry out too much.

For raspberries, I've grown the Latham Red from Stark Bros. It did well here...too well...as it became invasive in my garden and I had to get rid of it.
Raspberries i think i have figured out. We have woods edging the back and one side of our property and plenty of little spaces where the builder took a young tree out (the house is 2 years old) and nothing has grown in. I know Raspberries are invasive and also not very pretty, so I figured i will plop them in clusters along the back and the side of our backyard. It should be a perfect place for them to take over, fill oil and multiply.

Thanks for the recommendation on Rabbiteye. I see it for sale at local stores here, but we all know Home Depot sells everything to everyone and it won't necessarily grow here ;)
What do you mean by extra plants for pollination?
 
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I don't know the pH, but already reached out to the local arboretum and hoping they can test the soil for me. If it's too alkaline, would it be a successful attempt to amend the soil? or am i setting myself up for failure?

I have two spots- one would be very sunny, another one will be in front of kitchen windows and would have moderate shade. What do they prefer?
Full sun. And a low pH. 5.5 would do. When the test comes back let us know. Can you go here and figure out which series of soil is under your location?

As to masses of thorny plants...we set up a metal wire trellis like we saw at a local nursery called Petals from the Past. If you google search "petals from the past kiowa blackberries" you will find video and a Southern Living article where Jason Powell describes trellising biennial canes by cutting canes to the ground after the berries are done and using calcium nitrate fertilizer to assist the regrowth of new canes. The raspberries will grow from more than just the crown so can spread better in some ways. I staple some canes into the ground and they root. The sum total is it is not an impenetrable mess and the berries are easier to pick. The trellis can be any pleasing shape you wish. Obelisks come to mind.
 
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alp

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Try Eureka blueberry - just the size will cheer you up! Blueberries are not fussy. Just add a bit of ericaceous compost and lots of water. Add some well compost pine needles .. If I can grow mine, so can you!
 
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Full sun. And a low pH. 5.5 would do. When the test comes back let us know. Can you go here and figure out which series of soil is under your location?

As to masses of thorny plants...we set up a metal wire trellis like we saw at a local nursery called Petals from the Past. If you google search "petals from the past kiowa blackberries" you will find video and a Southern Living article where Jason Powell describes trellising biennial canes by cutting canes to the ground after the berries are done and using calcium nitrate fertilizer to assist the regrowth of new canes. The raspberries will grow from more than just the crown so can spread better in some ways. I staple some canes into the ground and they root. The sum total is it is not an impenetrable mess and the berries are easier to pick. The trellis can be any pleasing shape you wish. Obelisks come to mind.
PERFECT! Thank you so, so much for the recommendation on the trellis and how you treat the canes! it's really perfect and it's exactly what i will do! If i get 3 plants of each red and yellow, would i be able to cut and root some canes for new locations next year, you think?
thanks again!!

I'll be back with test results for the soil!
 
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Sorry wasn't clear...it helps to have multiple blueberry plants to get good pollination.
gotcha! i'm thinking 3 in one location or 4 in another, so i should be good?

Also, would they be a good landscaping plant? both locations would be by the house as part of the landscape.
 
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Try Eureka blueberry - just the size will cheer you up! Blueberries are not fussy. Just add a bit of ericaceous compost and lots of water. Add some well compost pine needles .. If I can grow mine, so can you!
That's great to hear! Pine needles is what i use now, so yes.
How big do Eurekas get? a decent-looking bush for the side of the house landscape?
 
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Also....would raspberries and blackberries be friends, if i plant them next to each other?
 
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gotcha! i'm thinking 3 in one location or 4 in another, so i should be good?

Also, would they be a good landscaping plant? both locations would be by the house as part of the landscape.
Not a good landscape plant unless you understand how to prune. Then every plant is a landscape plant so its a moot point. You could bonsai them.
 

Meadowlark

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Also....would raspberries and blackberries be friends, if i plant them next to each other?
Raspberries would be friends with the devil if it didn't stop its spreading. LOL. Seriously though, they might well cross pollinate giving you who knows what?
 
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Not a good landscape plant unless you understand how to prune. Then every plant is a landscape plant so its a moot point. You could bonsai them.
Well, I’d never put raspeberries, for example, in a landscape on the side of the house, bc of their rambling nature. Of course I will prune them into a rounded shape, but I wondered if they are naturally a good-looking bush this purpose.
Raspberries would be friends with the devil if it didn't stop its spreading. LOL. Seriously though, they might well cross pollinate giving you who knows what?
I can see that! Good thing I have lots of space they can ramble on in the tree clearings.

And maybe I’ll throw in a blackberry bush and see what happens ☺
 
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Actually I would say tbey could easily be used in a landscape, but they can be tall and leggy, and not particularly dense, so it would need perhaps a casual setting with shorter plants under them or in front. They cane, so thats a little weird
 

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