Are the majority of vegetable gardeners men?


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Is it just me or has anyone else noticed, that men always seem to be much more enthusiastic, when discussing all things related to fruit and vegetables compared to ornamental plants.

Have you ever noticed, that allotments seem to tended by more men than women, in fact where I live, a vegetable garden or allotment is regarded as a male status symbol, and women are only worthy of collecting and cooking the produce, and doing the occasional bit of weeding, under supervision !

How many women have you heard say " unless its edible, its not worthy of taking up space in my garden ".
or
Plant lettuces amongst exotic plants.
or
When standing next to a rare and exquisite ornamental plant will say " don't your tomatoes look pretty ", pretty is not a word I would use to describe tomato plants - but there you go.

What do you think?
 
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I know a few women who are into vegetable gardening, but that being said I do know far more men who grow their own veg. Maybe it's the hunter / gatherer instinct kicking in?! :D
 
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I know a lot of hard core female vegetable gardeners especially with people now getting into organic fruits and vegetables. I also know alot of men who take credit for the harvest, but I know the wives are out weeding and watering. Guess it all depends how you look at it.
 
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I too, enjoy all types of gardening and grow all the edibles, fruit and vegetables, including doing much of the hard graft in the vegetable garden, apart from the rotavating and the pinching out of tomato plants, which my other half really enjoys doing, and am glad he does, as I just can't manage the rotavator, it always runs away with me, and I hate pinching out tomato plants, and if I'm honest, my real passion is the growing of ornamentals, which is how the observations listed above came about.:)

Am still thinking women are in the minority, when it comes to the growing of edibles, and so far think, that Becky's idea is probably the most feasible, in that, there are more male vegetable gardeners because of the hunter/gather instinct kicking in.:D

Headfullofbees - Haven't found Farming to be outgrowing the hunter/gather instinct in my neck of the woods, and would say, I probably have equal quantities of both.
 

zigs

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I'm a bloke and i'm mainly veg. But I do grow the odd flower or two. Veg patch is looking a bit of a mess at the moment, as loads of Borage came up between the potatoes, haven't had the heart to clear it even though its going over as the bees are still loving it.

Bees - 6,000 years is too soon to outgrow instinct. Northern Europe still has a diet problem that dates back to the last ice age, 8 to 10 thousand years ago.

We're still programmed to eat fatty foods to survive the cold. People from Southern parts that didn't go thru an ice age don't have the same problems.
 
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Is it just me or has anyone else noticed, that men always seem to be much more enthusiastic, when discussing all things related to fruit and vegetables compared to ornamental plants.

What do you think?
I don't know that I'd agree with you gata, or maybe it's more region specific. My grandmothers, mother, sisters, and nieces all have huge vegetable gardens, and I actually only know one fellow who gardens - a friend at work. I also love my flower garden, but to be quite honest I grew vegetables for years before I really got in to flowers. And I have flowers in my vegetable beds, and vegetables and herbs in my flower beds. And, while my husband appreciates the vegetables and herbs I grow, he's really more interested in the flower beds out front.

We're still programmed to eat fatty foods to survive the cold. People from Southern parts that didn't go thru an ice age don't have the same problems.
Tell me about it, Zigs! I've got eastern European blood on my Dad's side, and as soon as it starts getting cold my body feels the need to store up as much fat as possible for the winter!!!
 
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I'm a girl and I love growing vegetables!:D But I must say that I find tomatoes and peas and carrots really pretty, so I feel that they aren't too far away from ornamental plants:)
Also, when I think about it, I must add that I prefer growing my miniature roses. I really love doing it.
 
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TheCrazyPlantLady - am not sure that its region specific, these observations have come from countries around the world, but have to say, there have been a lot more female responses than I expected, perhaps women are just quieter than men, about their gardening activities. :D
I agree with you regarding, flowers in the vegetable patch to a degree, as some are beneficial, and definitely agree with you in terms of herbs in the flower borders, not only for their looks but also for their scent, but still couldn't bring myself to put lettuces with exotic plants.


Claudine - I agree carrot tops can look attractive, but somehow can't manage to call tomatoes or peas pretty, especially when standing next to an exquisite plant.


Zigs - I come from Southern parts, but obviously haven't been programmed correctly and don't eat enough fatty foods, as I feel the cold terribly.
191793001378555514.gif
 
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Claudine - I agree carrot tops can look attractive, but somehow can't manage to call tomatoes or peas pretty, especially when standing next to an exquisite plant.

I honestly like looking at them for aesthetic reasons:) I don't know, maybe I think that they're so pretty because I love them so much and I can't be objective:p
Anyway,here are some pictures that I found, I hope that you'll change your mind after looking at them:):

tomato-plant.jpg


2195pea__green_sugar_ed.jpg
 
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I honestly like looking at them for aesthetic reasons:) I don't know, maybe I think that they're so pretty because I love them so much and I can't be objective:p
Anyway,here are some pictures that I found, I hope that you'll change your mind after looking at them:):

tomato-plant.jpg


2195pea__green_sugar_ed.jpg


Still not sure that I could describe them as pretty, even though that tomato plant looks particularly attractive in that pot, my best description for that would be ' yummy ':)
 
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Haha, I guess we just have to agree to disagree:p But yup, it really does look yummy:D I love everything about tomatoes, I like the way they look, I like their scent and I love eating them!
 
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TheCrazyPlantLady - am not sure that its region specific, these observations have come from countries around the world, but have to say, there have been a lot more female responses than I expected, perhaps women are just quieter than men, about their gardening activities. :D
I agree with you regarding, flowers in the vegetable patch to a degree, as some are beneficial, and definitely agree with you in terms of herbs in the flower borders, not only for their looks but also for their scent, but still couldn't bring myself to put lettuces with exotic plants.


Claudine - I agree carrot tops can look attractive, but somehow can't manage to call tomatoes or peas pretty, especially when standing next to an exquisite plant.

I think maybe, that men tend to be more competitive about their gardening - wanting to grow the biggest, or the rarest, or best tasting - and so they are more visible in their gardening endeavours.

I have to side with Claudine on the looks side. I think many vegetables are beautiful, and what's better, they smell amazing (like tomatoes). I wouldn't necessarily grow tomatoes in my flower beds, but that is more a question of the placement of the beds and what is best for the tomatoes, because I actually love the looks of a garden that is a total mix of flower, vegetable and herb. But I do have herbs, and I'll be planting garlic around my roses this fall, to help keep the pests at bay. And I have many ornamental onions in my flower beds (alliums) and they are among my favourite flowers.

But I think that this is more a personal taste issue. I love pansies, but I don't like lilies. I love sage in my flower bed, but I'd never want a carnation. But for other people, lilies and carnations are their favourite flowers. And a good thing too - that's what makes wandering around the neighbourhood checking out other people's gardens so interesting! :p
 
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I don't know that I'd agree with you gata, or maybe it's more region specific. My grandmothers, mother, sisters, and nieces all have huge vegetable gardens, and I actually only know one fellow who gardens - a friend at work. I also love my flower garden, but to be quite honest I grew vegetables for years before I really got in to flowers. And I have flowers in my vegetable beds, and vegetables and herbs in my flower beds. And, while my husband appreciates the vegetables and herbs I grow, he's really more interested in the flower beds out front.


Tell me about it, Zigs! I've got eastern European blood on my Dad's side, and as soon as it starts getting cold my body feels the need to store up as much fat as possible for the winter!!!
Ah yes...I'm feeling a bit of a chill. Must be time for some bacon n' eggs.;)
 
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My dad loved the idea of being capable to grow his own vegetables, he also loved the idea of keeping only ''useful'' trees in his property. He liked to keep fruit trees mostly, because he really wanted to be able to grow his own fruit. He taught me a lot basics, he always included me in his vegetable gardening projects :) We grew a lot things together!
 
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TheCrazyPlantLady, this is exactly what I'm talking about. In my opinion gardens that are a little eclectic are the prettiest, it looks really nice when vegetables grow near herbs and near ornamental flowers. I really like it:) In my dream garden, I'll grow them all!:D
 
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TheCrazyPlantLady, - Ah, the competitive spirit,:D I would definitely agree with that, this is something that always appears, to be very strongly associated with vegetable patches, but also, is in all of us to one degree or another. I would probably fall into this category, but quietly and not for show, as I really enjoy the challenge of growing something slightly different or unusual, and am always aiming to grow the tastiest and most flavorsome fruit and vegetables.
I have however, noticed the strong competition between the male vegetable growers in my area, particularly for size and quantity and they are most certainly, all very loud about it! As for taste, I'm not sure this is a priority in their case, as I have just been on the receiving end, of some prize winning Zucchini, which looked fantastic, but can't tell you what they tasted like, as the skins were so hard, even a chainsaw would have struggled to cut them - haven't had the heart to tell him yet, as he was so proud of them.

Claudine and TheCrazyPlantLady - Personal taste, now this is what I like about gardening. Everybody's garden has a little bit of them in it, what I call the soul of the garden and this is what makes looking, at any type of garden so enjoyable.

Claudine - I don't think I will ever be able to describe tomatoes as pretty, but I do have a confession to make.:) I do have a Rose, covering an unsightly corner of the vegetable patch, it is a Rosa Banksiae - its not a minature, like the ones you like - but it is a Rose. :D
 
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Although miniature roses are dearest to me, the truth is that I love all roses:D. Rosa Banksiae is gorgeous, I googled it and I saw some pictures of it. I wish I had it in my garden!
Is your rose white or yellow? I'm sure that it looks beautiful!:D
 
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Gosh, of the 10 people I know who have veggie gardens only two are male (based on friends and the neighborhood garden walk this spring). One is a stay at home dad and the other male is retired. From my experiences for my region (western USA) the only thing the man usually does (if the family has a large garden/yard) is rototill and mow the lawn. Then everything else from planting, weeding, watering,harvest and food prep is left up to a woman. I know that was really true where I grew up in Idaho. No man would be caught in the garden unless it was some super special prize plant they were babying to dhow off. Gardens here are generally a woman's domain.
 
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I agree, it's the same in my area. My mother spends a lot of time in our garden, while my father goes there only when he has to. None of my male friends enjoy gardening. My boyfriend grows chilli peppers, but that's it. On the other hand, I don't know too many women who like taking care of plants either. Maybe it's because I live in a big city though.
 

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