Apple tree disease


Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Hi! I have a honeycrisp apple tree with a disease I can’t identify. The leaves have turned brown and look scorched. It’s not dead because it has new growth at the top. I’ve included pictures. I would greatly appreciate some advice on how to save it. Thanks!
9BD7FB9D-0801-4595-9CDB-9C9164D95F5F.jpeg
AF7F61A6-4666-4ADE-82C5-035882016FD5.jpeg
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,265
Reaction score
3,550
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Hi! I have a honeycrisp apple tree with a disease I can’t identify. The leaves have turned brown and look scorched. It’s not dead because it has new growth at the top. I’ve included pictures. I would greatly appreciate some advice on how to save it. Thanks!View attachment 57063View attachment 57064
I can't tell what the disease is at this late stage. Immediately after the tree leafed out did you notice ANYTHING about the leaves that wasn't normal. On the top of the tree I see skeletonized leaves. That is from insects or caterpillars. You can use a spinosad based insecticide to fix this but not the rest of the tree. It is probably a fungal disease but could be bacterial. I would call an arborist out to fix the problem.
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Thank you Chuck. I did not notice anything unusual with the leaves. There were no bugs or caterpillars. It does not appear as Japanese beetle bug damage either. They just turned brown and scorched. I will get in touch with an arborist. Thanks again!
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,265
Reaction score
3,550
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Possibly fire blight.
At first I thought fire blight but the leaves aren't totally brown and fire blight affects stems and the trunk too. It turns them a matte black color. What I think has happened is that the lower leaves contracted some fungal disease while the younger higher leaves became distressed because of this and some insect or caterpillar attacked and skeletonized them.
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Thank you Chuck and posiepurrs. I actually went to the nursery and spoke with an arborist there. She felt it was two problems- black spot fungus and caterpillar damage. I never once saw any caterpillar or other insect, even with daily inspections. She told me to spray with a fungicide and to apply Biotone. Chuck, you were correct in your assessment. I wish there was something I could apply prophylactically so this doesn’t happen again next year. Of course I realize that I may have to forgo eating any fruit (if we ever get there) so that I have a healthy tree. Thank you again for your help!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,265
Reaction score
3,550
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you Chuck and posiepurrs. I actually went to the nursery and spoke with an arborist there. She felt it was two problems- black spot fungus and caterpillar damage. I never once saw any caterpillar or other insect, even with daily inspections. She told me to spray with a fungicide and to apply Biotone. Chuck, you were correct in your assessment. I wish there was something I could apply prophylactically so this doesn’t happen again next year. Of course I realize that I may have to forgo eating any fruit (if we ever get there) so that I have a healthy tree. Thank you again for your help!
There is something you can do. Directly before the tree leafs out you can spray horticultural oil or neem oil. This will kill any insect eggs which may have overwintered. Then, after the tree has fully leafed out you can spray either a homemade anti-fungal such as baking soda or Neem which will prophylactically stop fungal problems from starting. Maintain a close watch for any insect damage. A spinosad based insecticide will control any insect or caterpillar you may encounter. I don't know if you have mulched around the base of the tree or not but this also helps protect the tree from insects and fungal diseases, just don't let it touch the tree or any roots that are showing above the ground.
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
There is something you can do. Directly before the tree leafs out you can spray horticultural oil or neem oil. This will kill any insect eggs which may have overwintered. Then, after the tree has fully leafed out you can spray either a homemade anti-fungal such as baking soda or Neem which will prophylactically stop fungal problems from starting. Maintain a close watch for any insect damage. A spinosad based insecticide will control any insect or caterpillar you may encounter. I don't know if you have mulched around the base of the tree or not but this also helps protect the tree from insects and fungal diseases, just don't let it touch the tree or any roots that are showing above the ground.
Thank you Chuck! Do I spray that the neem oil on the trunk and branches of just where the leaves are about to sprout?
I did mulch around the base of the tree. I will pull it back from the trunk though. There are no roots showing.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,265
Reaction score
3,550
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you Chuck! Do I spray that the neem oil on the trunk and branches of just where the leaves are about to sprout?
I did mulch around the base of the tree. I will pull it back from the trunk though. There are no roots showing.
Spray every inch of the tree. Insects overwinter in the cracks of the bark and their eggs can be anywhere on the tree. I really hope your tree isn't planted too deep. Google root flare. There is a LOT of information and pictures explaining the do's and dont's of planting a tree and what will happen if planted wrong.
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Hi Chuck, thank you again. I will spray every part of it. I’m determined to keep it healthy. I googled root flare and assessed the bottom of the trunk. I followed the directions for proper planting. I’ve attached pictures. Please let me know. I’ve also attached a picture showing new growth on the lowest branch.
 

Attachments

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,265
Reaction score
3,550
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Hi Chuck, thank you again. I will spray every part of it. I’m determined to keep it healthy. I googled root flare and assessed the bottom of the trunk. I followed the directions for proper planting. I’ve attached pictures. Please let me know. I’ve also attached a picture showing new growth on the lowest branch.
Root flare looks OK. I don't know where you live (please update your profile) but it is getting a little late in the year to be putting on new growth. And that growth is in the wrong place and is going to grow in the wrong direction. Depending on where you live that new growth may be a hindrance to your trees overall health because you may not have enough time for the growth to mature before it freezes. I would snip it off. Other growth may appear on areas of the tree where it is in the correct place and growing in the right direction. I would leave this growth. If new growth appears shortly (45 days) before your first frost I would remove it also. The reason for this is that new non-mature growth will freeze and weaken the tree. The reason you tree is putting on new growth is because it has lost nearly all of its foliage. It is getting late in the year and your tree will soon start to lose all of its leaves. This non-mature growth will continue to keep growing until it freezes. This is why new growth starts in the spring and slows to almost nothing in the summer.
Using Neem Oil and spinosad you can apply it up to the day of harvest. It is harmless to pets and humans.
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 23, 2019
Messages
49
Reaction score
31
Location
New England
Hardiness Zone
6
Country
United States
At first I thought fire blight but the leaves aren't totally brown and fire blight affects stems and the trunk too. It turns them a matte black color. What I think has happened is that the lower leaves contracted some fungal disease while the younger higher leaves became distressed because of this and some insect or caterpillar attacked and skeletonized them.
Good call! I missed on the coloration of the trunk.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top