Anxiety and planning a garden


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Wife and I just purchased our first house.
Prince Edward Island Canada.
They tell me that anything will grow here.
The native soil imo is interesting stuff! Its soft, red, consistent like its made of cake lol.
No big rocks, drains well, very easy to dig.

Our goal is to become "self sufficient" for produce.
I would like to grow our food for the year, can, dry, freeze, pickle etc.

But planning for next spring is driving me crazy! I do have anxiety issues... So all this stuff has me like a deer in the headlights.

I must learn about compost, pests and diseases, preserving food, building gardens, soil, watering, timing of the garden, like when to start what and when to harvest... And how to keep it going year after year.

So far its pretty overwhelming!
 
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Wife and I just purchased our first house.
Prince Edward Island Canada.
They tell me that anything will grow here.
The native soil imo is interesting stuff! Its soft, red, consistent like its made of cake lol.
No big rocks, drains well, very easy to dig.

Our goal is to become "self sufficient" for produce.
I would like to grow our food for the year, can, dry, freeze, pickle etc.

But planning for next spring is driving me crazy! I do have anxiety issues... So all this stuff has me like a deer in the headlights.

I must learn about compost, pests and diseases, preserving food, building gardens, soil, watering, timing of the garden, like when to start what and when to harvest... And how to keep it going year after year.

So far its pretty overwhelming!
No its not. Just plant what you like to eat and be patient. No way to screw up gaining experience.
 
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Gardening is a pleasure, not anxiety inducing!
Compost--stuff rots. As long as you don't add dairy or meat to your pile, just dump it, turn it occasionally if you don't have anything else to do, and dig the "black gold" out from the bottom of the pile.
Pests and diseases--most can be repelled or contained. If you see something concerning, take a photo and post it here. Someone will have an idea/cure/containment for it. We all get pests and diseases on our plants, so don't get overwrought about them.
Watering--if you can stick your finger into the soil up to the knuckle closest to your hand (roughly two inches) and the soil is dry, water until the soil shimmers with the water. Roots go deep, so when you think the top 1/2" of soil is dry, the deeper soil is still moist and the roots are drinking.
About planting/timing in your garden. Does your government universities offer a planting guide for your area? Texas has one for each of our areas, and I've found it very helpful. Ours wouldn't do you a bit of good, but if your area has something like a county agent, area agricultural agency, or similar, they may be able to give you a guide.
You are over-thinking gardening. Humans have been at this for thousands of years, and sometimes it works and sometimes it fails. Just try, and as Sheal said, "Just plant what you like to eat and be patient."
The best advice I can give is enjoy your garden, don't worry or fret, and take each day in stride.
 
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Don't try to do it all year one! I'm a newbie in my second year of gardening. Start small, you'll learn a lot along the way and scaling up won't be so daunting.

Oh, and all the stuff you mention learning... That just makes you better and more informed, but the basics are simple. Put seeds in ground, add water and sun, plants grow. Have fun with it!
 

alp

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Get horse manure, chicken manure and seaweed, coffee grind, green waste, also add torn cardboard iinto the mix and cover with cardboard or tarp to keep the warmth in and suppress weeds for the winter and let worms do the jobs for you. Add them layer by layer.

Yesterday, in our Beechgrove garden, an organic venture uses tons of horse manure and covered with straw and adds tiger worms and tilts it so that they can harvest the juice. Then the wormcast can be used to add into garden soil. Don't think of doing everything in one go. Go to youtube and google no dig garden. Grow some comfrey for fertilsers and fixing the soil. You can do it. First the soil and horse manure, cow manure on top .. Don't let it frighten you.
 
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Gail_68

Beauty blooms in the garden as well as the heart.
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Hi @Anvilguy I understand regarding anxiety but over the years looking after gardens from when I was young till now is relaxing and will be good for your stress levels...your not in a race against anyone else and knowing what you want and how you want it planned out takes time...so take your time...members are here to help you and if you want to add pic's for them to help you further it's even better :)
 
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Try not to spaz-out......It's not rocket science. Keep in mind.....It's a do, redo, repeat learning curve......once your hands get into the dirt, it'll pull the anxiety right out.
 
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