6 weeks before last frost

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I know everyone is getting antsy about spring planting, getting their seeds started as early as possible and when there is no more chance of a frost, getting all those seedlings into the ground ASAP. Well, getting them into the ground ASAP is a mistake many of you will make as you forgot about the second most important thing, soil temperature. On many vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons, okra etc. if you plant before the soil is warm enough at 3 inches deep, your seedlings won't die but their growth is either stopped or slowed greatly. They will still produce albeit to a lessor extent so why plant before the correct time? A plant planted later at the correct soil temperature will catch up and surpass a plant planted in the wrong soil temperature. A soil thermometer is a necessary tool and they are cheap and will last forever. The following link is the best one I have found that has a chart.

 
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I know everyone is getting antsy about spring planting, getting their seeds started as early as possible and when there is no more chance of a frost, getting all those seedlings into the ground ASAP. Well, getting them into the ground ASAP is a mistake many of you will make as you forgot about the second most important thing, soil temperature. On many vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons, okra etc. if you plant before the soil is warm enough at 3 inches deep, your seedlings won't die but their growth is either stopped or slowed greatly. They will still produce albeit to a lessor extent so why plant before the correct time? A plant planted later at the correct soil temperature will catch up and surpass a plant planted in the wrong soil temperature. A soil thermometer is a necessary tool and they are cheap and will last forever. The following link is the best one I have found that has a chart.

@Chuck thanks for the link. I would like to ask what pathogens such as fungi are doing at those ineffective soil temps. I ask as a gardener parting a sterility window, and I know I recognize the post mortem reality of a garden past its prime season, my question wants to know about how much I am accelerating my problems preseason by putting what amounts to a sluggish bait into the soil? Also I would be interested to hear from @zigs a bit if he is done making mushroom marks in the fresh tilling!
 
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@Chuck thanks for the link. I would like to ask what pathogens such as fungi are doing at those ineffective soil temps. I ask as a gardener parting a sterility window, and I know I recognize the post mortem reality of a garden past its prime season, my question wants to know about how much I am accelerating my problems preseason by putting what amounts to a sluggish bait into the soil? Also I would be interested to hear from @zigs a bit if he is done making mushroom marks in the fresh tilling!
AFAIK no pathogens arise beyond the normal, i.e. damping off and root rot pathogens. Planting in low temp soils slows the metabolic processes of plants and I know of no other detriments to the actual growing medium. I don't know for a fact if the growth rate of fungal pathogens accelerate or not. Just from experience I'd say that they slow in growth.

Thank goodness that we here in the colonies have evolved technology to a point where the old methods such as @zigs employs are no longer used.:unsure:
 
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AFAIK no pathogens arise beyond the normal, i.e. damping off and root rot pathogens. Planting in low temp soils slows the metabolic processes of plants and I know of no other detriments to the actual growing medium. I don't know for a fact if the growth rate of fungal pathogens accelerate or not. Just from experience I'd say that they slow in growth.

Thank goodness that we here in the colonies have evolved technology to a point where the old methods such as @zigs employs are no longer used.:unsure:
Not so sure. I heard the three sisters were set on a round pile so He may be on top of something.

I was curious as to the ideal germination and transplant temps of pathogens as a foil against the chart in your excellent link.
 
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Not so sure. I heard the three sisters were set on a round pile so He may be on top of something.

I was curious as to the ideal germination and transplant temps of pathogens as a foil against the chart in your excellent link.
Pathogens are something I am curious about but actually know very little. What I'd really like to know is how to get rid of them. If someone ever figures that out they and their unborn progeny can retire.
 
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Pathogens are something I am curious about but actually know very little. What I'd really like to know is how to get rid of them. If someone ever figures that out they and their unborn progeny can retire.
Your cornmeal and tricoderma started me on this path.

Oh by the way, wanna know how we officially recognize spring at my house? Here is a hint, it has to do with my Becky.

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@zigs so I was being curious because you have such a knowledge of fungi if you could suggest guidance on this idea of "what temp fungi" emergence vs the well recorded study of "food crops" and the temps related to them. Could there be a defense based on temps or timing is the back question. Your knowledgs of fungal nuances has something to say here, but I am not sure I could even form the proper question. Hopefully you have had a warming toddy and can hold forth?
 
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I planted some parsnips and kohrabi. Cabbage will get planted in the next day or so. In a week or so going to start some tomato plants inside so in April their good size plants.
 
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@zigs so I was being curious because you have such a knowledge of fungi if you could suggest guidance on this idea of "what temp fungi" emergence vs the well recorded study of "food crops" and the temps related to them. Could there be a defense based on temps or timing is the back question. Your knowledgs of fungal nuances has something to say here, but I am not sure I could even form the proper question. Hopefully you have had a warming toddy and can hold forth?
This is an interesting question:
If you inoculate a transplanted tree or bush, etc. with mycorrhizal fungi, the least harmful way is usually to move it when it is "dormant", yet mycorrhizal fungi will colonise the roots immediately, so it doesn't seem to be temp. driven. This also has implications for the term "dormant" as the question is begged, "How does the fungus know the plant is there?"
In "Onion White Rot", the sclerotia can lay dormant in the soil for 15-20 years, and will only germinate if they are within 1/2 inch of allium roots." It tends to have some temperature dependency too, as the sclerotia like to germinate at temps between 10-20 C (50-68f).
With late potato blight, a combination of temperature and humidity are required.
Club root needs acidic soil (a little garden lime in the (trans)planting hole will prevent the spores from opening), yet mycorrhizal fungi don't like acid soil.
Potato scab spores can't open at a pH less than 5.1, yet, to prevent powdery mildew spores from opening, a mildly alkaline spray of very dilute milk in water is required.
So as you can see, it's not just plants, it's a complicated picture with fungi too.
 

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@zigs so I was being curious because you have such a knowledge of fungi if you could suggest guidance on this idea of "what temp fungi" emergence vs the well recorded study of "food crops" and the temps related to them. Could there be a defense based on temps or timing is the back question. Your knowledgs of fungal nuances has something to say here, but I am not sure I could even form the proper question. Hopefully you have had a warming toddy and can hold forth?
Think Bees has answered that question better than I could :)

I do know that with potato/tomato blight it's important to not leave any plant material in the ground to let the fungus overwinter as they can form Oospores :eek:

 
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